Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Sandy Theis seems confused

Sandy Theis is a former advisor to Ted Strickland and Jennifer Brunner, and currently is a principle at Ted's consulting firm, Midwest Gateway Partners.

Looking at her Twitter stream, she is obviously an advocate for the union front group We Are Ohio, and puts out tweets that she believes are supportive of WAO in their effort to overturn the reasonable public-sector collective bargaining reforms contained in Senate Bill 5. Yesterday, she tweeted this:
DOL: pvt sector pays $2.12/hr toward health benes; public pays $4.72/hr http://t.co/KGzNVZ33 #SB5 #Issue2 #WeAreOhio

The link she posted is to a Dayton Daily News article about the upcoming vote on Issue 2. Let's take a look at the actual quote from the article, instead of Sandy's abbreviated version.
The U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics reported in March that private sector employers paid on average $2.12 an hour toward employee health care coverage compared with $4.72 an hour state and local government employers paid toward worker health insurance.
Yes, that's right. Health care benefits paid by public-sector employers, meaning you and me as the taxpayers, cost over twice as much as what private sector employers pay.

Gee, thanks for the information, Sandy! I think I'll forward that statistic over to the good folks at Building a Better Ohio. They might find it useful in educating Ohioans about the reasons why collective bargaining reform is a financial necessity. I'm glad you're helping out both sides of the Issue 2 debate by putting out facts that both sides can use.

Oh wait. What? She wasn't trying to help the "Yes on Issue 2" side? You mean, she actually thought that the article was talking about what the costs are to the employEES, not the employERS? That can't be, can it? Sandy is "a master at media relations and message development!"

Doh. Ohio Democrats. Reading is hard. (And thanks again for highlighting the high cost of public sector benefits!)

Update: Sandy deleted her tweet. But she can't delete the ones from her followers who also noticed that she had trouble reading.


  1. How can you even put this "story" on "your" blog when was already on Twitter? You have no story. LOL.

    No one reads this blog anyway.

  2. Doh! You're right! Better take it down.


  3. She's supposed to be their messaging person?

    Wow. Explains why they lost every office in Ohio.

  4. Because everyone in the known universe has Twitter, right Modern?

    Oh they don't?

    Well, I guess having it on a blog seems like a great idea -- and since it's reaching audience members who don't Tweet (like me) it actually IS a story.

    Nice F(l)ail on your part.


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