Friday, July 2, 2010

Haley Dominates.

For the uninitiated, the DGA and the RGA are the two Party organizations assigned with the responsibility of electing Governors. They spend money. And lots of it.

Well, today the DGA did the exact thing I was mocking this afternoon on twitter: releasing bad news on the Friday afternoon before a holiday.

The DGA announced they raised $9 million in the 2nd quarter of 2010. That sounds like a lot. And in fact, it's a record breaking amount for them.

But it's a hill of beans compared to the $19 million raised by the RGA in the same amount of time.

Overall, the RGA has nearly double the amount of cash-on-hand as the DGA. When each side has a number of races to target, that's a big deal. It means the RGA can invest in more states and invest more than the DGA in each state.

In other words, if Kasich is unable to cut into the Governor's $2 million advantage, it's very possible the RGA could compensate if they so choose.

Additionally, having far more impact than the DGA means good things for down ticket races. After all, one of the biggest influences for a congressional race and every other down ticket race is the top of the ticket performing well.

All this good news for the RGA coincides with a very timely ranking of most influential Republicans as listed by the Washington Post.

At number 1? Haley Barbour. Chairman of the RGA:
Barbour's Republican Governors Association has become the story of the 2010 midterms. The RGA's second quarter fundraising numbers -- $19 million raised, $40 million on hand -- is an eye-popping total that should remind those who have forgotten about Barbour's reach in the GOP donor community. With Republicans poised to make significant gains at the gubernatorial level this fall, Barbour will almost certainly emerge with momentum after the November elections -- momentum that he may seek to channel into a presidential exploratory bid.
Of course, 3BP realized Barbour was going to be the MVP of the midterms all the way back in February. But who's keeping track, right?


1 comment:

  1. I hope they start spending some of it in Ohio. All I'm seeing are Strickland's ads hammering him for working at Lehman. Would be nice to see some counterweight.


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