Saturday, June 5, 2010

New Strickland Campaign Motto: I'm going to raise taxes!

This is very simple, folks.

Yesterday, John Kasich signed the National Taxpayers Union pledge to not raise taxes as Governor.

That means Kasich and his team have determined that his Administration can manage Ohio's massive $8 billion shortfall in the next budget without raising taxes. It's not a "gimmick", as Strickland's campaign claims. Why? A gimmick would be a policy proposal in which Kasich would not necessarily have to adhere to while Governor. If Kasich balked on his pledge he would destroy his credibility within his base and surrender any chance of re-election.

And what was the response of the Strickland campaign?
Asked if that meant Strickland would consider raising taxes as part of a budget-balancing solution, Smith declined to be definitive: "Ted believes it's irresponsible to make blanket statements about future governing decisions without knowing what the future circumstances will be. However, given the economic recovery that the nation and Ohio are beginning to see, he continues to believe that a tax increase would be unwise."
There is no other way to read this than...


When a candidate refuses to state they won't raise taxes, they will raise your taxes.

And why do we know this? Other than that's what has happened every time any candidate in the history of politics has said the same thing?

Fine. Let's look at Strickland. In 1993, Strickland supported Clinton's tax hike, one of the largest in American history. Then look at 1994 when Ted said more tax increases may be necessary. That cost him his seat.

Oh, then there's that pesky retroactive income tax increase this past year as Governor.

At best, Smith's comment highlights that Strickland has no idea how to fill the $8 billion budget shortfall. If Strickland had a plan, he would know whether he needs to raise, maintain, or cut taxes. Instead, they don't know. It's frightening to think that the current elected Governor, someone who has been in office for nearly four years, has no idea how to handle the largest financial crisis in the history of Ohio.

So what happens when Kasich cuts or maintains the current tax structure within Ohio? Cuts.

And that's a good thing. The belief that cutting government isn't necessary presupposes that government is operating at peak efficiency. And we all know that at both the local and state level, that's not happening. At all levels, Ohio needs restructured. Ohio needs John Kasich.

No comments:

Post a Comment

No profanity, keep it clean.

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.